Sep/2/14
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Sep/2/14
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hera-salander replied to your post “You know how I broke it off with that guy? Well, we hung out tonight,…”

You can still break things off with this guy if you need to. If you didn’t like snogging him, then you should be able to go out and kiss other people. Besides, you guys are not dating, right?

That’s true. I think he assumes we’re dating, but I’m not really feeling it. There hasn’t really been anything definite said, though. I thought I might have been, but I don’t think I’m ready to settle down, especially not now that I’ve realized we’re really incompatible in that way. I think I need somebody who knows what they’re doing, and who I’m properly physically attracted to. It sucks, though, because as much as it hurts my cold, ENTP pride to admit it, I care about him, and I don’t want to break his heart.

If I was to meet somebody who I worked well with in most ways, then perhaps I could settle down, but I just kind of want to go out and experience things for now, and figure out what works.




Sep/2/14
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You know how I broke it off with that guy? Well, we hung out tonight, and we ended up snogging, which I imagine means my fear of intimacy spiel went to waste. It was a disappointing experience. I don’t know whether it’s me who’s the bad kisser, but it seemed like he just opened his mouth, and hoped for the best, and our mouths didn’t line up properly, and it just seemed like a failure overall. I really wanted to like kissing, too, and - as dorky as it sounds - it’s something I’ve spent a lot of time studying to figure out the proper technique, and the fact that that seems wasted makes it seem extra disappointing. I know he has no proper experience, either, but it seems like anything he’s learnt, he’s probably learnt from pornography, which I think is an awful example.

Also, I can already feel the beard burn coming on. I dislike beards even more now.




Sep/1/14
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ENTP Confessions #7

days-of-an-entp:

There’s pain to being an ENTP. It’s a mix of everything. You’ll fit in everywhere yet nowhere. You’re extremely arrogant yet painfully aware of all of your faults. Capable of anything yet not motivated to do a thing. Witty and charismatic but have low tolerance for people. Great with advice but follow none of it. You’re most likely a genius but have trouble handling your own emotions. You’re an extrovert who needs lots personal space. You love being different but hate being misunderstood. Have brilliant ideas but lack the patience to follow through with them. You’ll have more interests than anyone you know but get bored with every one of them.

You’re a walking paradox. 

As much as that may frustrate those close to you, it’s nothing compared to the sleepless nights it causes you. 




Sep/1/14
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Sometimes when I discover a new fascinating piece of information my mind gets really excited and I experience what I can only describe as an intellectual orgasm.



Sep/1/14
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Sep/1/14
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iwillsavemyworld:

elisabeth9uk:

bxrakat:

bxrakat:

hi so my friend alice has been missing for over 24 hours now and everyone is getting really worried, so if you live around london uk would you please ring 101 if you see this girl, it would mean a lot thank you bye

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-28997068 this bbc news story explains more about it so please help if you can #findalice

Please help find Alice - west London - URGENT help needed

PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST THIS
she was last seen in Kew by the canal, but she could have walked anywhere from there
shes only 14 and has health problems that make her seriously vulnerable
another pic of her:

REBLOG YOU NEVER KNOW IF ANY OF YOUR FOLLOWERS MAY LIVE IN WEST LONDON AND KNOW SOMETHING THAT COULD HELP

iwillsavemyworld:

elisabeth9uk:

bxrakat:

bxrakat:

hi so my friend alice has been missing for over 24 hours now and everyone is getting really worried, so if you live around london uk would you please ring 101 if you see this girl, it would mean a lot thank you bye

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-28997068 this bbc news story explains more about it so please help if you can #findalice

Please help find Alice - west London - URGENT help needed

PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST THIS

she was last seen in Kew by the canal, but she could have walked anywhere from there

shes only 14 and has health problems that make her seriously vulnerable

another pic of her:

REBLOG YOU NEVER KNOW IF ANY OF YOUR FOLLOWERS MAY LIVE IN WEST LONDON AND KNOW SOMETHING THAT COULD HELP




Sep/1/14
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panicacidide:

Apparently it’s not socially acceptable for a man to invite another man out just for coffee or to go out for a meal, in case it’s perceived as a date. Like it’s fine if you wanna go to the pub and drink beer and have a chat but make it non-alcoholic and suddenly you’re not straight anymore? You can go to the cinema together but ONLY if it’s an action movie. You guys can’t even just go shopping with each other. Oh masculinity, so fragile, so strange. 




Sep/1/14
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I’ve always gotten on incredibly well with autistic children. As somebody who was thought to have autism, and who does have sensory processing disorder and ADHD, among other things, I kind of operate on the same level. 

For example; my 7-year-old sister who is currently being tested for autism is prone to bouts of almost uncontrollable anger, but I’ve learned that if you run a pencil or another slightly rough object over the palm of her hand, scratch her head, or even just ask her if she wants to talk about what’s upsetting her, or prompt conversation about something she’s interested in (basically just attempt to understand her), she’ll often eventually calm down and start talking normally. People - even my mum - are always shocked by that, but to me it’s always seemed normal, because as a child I was exactly the same. My mum always had to stroke my hair to calm me down, and I can remember never really feeling understood or able to articulate what exactly was wrong, so I never expect them to.

I wish more people understood that, rather than pushing them to be a certain way. It’s not that hard to get on their level, and to devote some time to letting them be themselves. In fact, it’s rewarding to do so, as they often have remarkable talents and interests that can only grow when nurtured. I had a bunch of odd interests and talents that were well above my age level, and I’m still sad, to this day, that I was almost always shut down and ridiculed for them, and people focused on fitting me into a definition that wasn’t me, because I feel I could have been so much more than what I am. Children shouldn’t be treated that way. Systems should be adapted to them, not the other way around.




Sep/1/14
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andreashettle:

foundbysara:

"He has autism. I’m really surprised he was playing with you."

This happens sometimes at work, and I’m never sure how to react. A parent (or other adult) will come up to me after I’ve been playing with their child, and point out that the child’s current behavior is really unusual for them.

Sometimes it’s young kids who just seem overwhelmed by their surroundings, and we’ll just sit together for a little bit. I’ll talk about things—their shoes, the weather, the character on their shirt—for little while, and then listen when they start talking. If they start talking—often, they don’t,and that’s okay.

Sometimes it’s a copycat game. They’ll hide from me, and I’ll hide from them. They peek out, and I peek out. They put their hands up, and I put my hands up. When they realize that everything I do is copying them, their actions get more intentional, silly, fun.

Last week there was a young man in our new Thomas the Tank Engine gallery. I talked with him for a minute, and it was immediately clear that he a.) loved trains, and b.) hated eye contact. So I stopped trying to make eye contact, and we played in parallel, not facing each other, but talking about trains, Thomas, the toys he had at home.

And it happened again, the grown-up coming up afterwards and confessing “He’s autistic, he doesn’t usually talk to people.”

And I smiled and said, “Well, it seems like he’s having fun,” because I didn’t know what else to say. And it did seem that way, and that’s great.

But I never know how to react when parents say that to me. They always seem pleased, grateful, even, and I guess they must mean it as a compliment. And if I made their day brighter, and (more importantly) their child’s day brighter, good. That’s wonderful, and it’s what I try to do with everyone who comes to the museum.

But it’s also weird, because—it’s what I do with everyone who comes to the museum. I’m not a therapist, I’m not a specialist, I’m not some mysterious Autism Whisperer. I just try to connect with kids and make their days better. I don’t have special tactics for “dealing with” autistic kids. I don’t even work in an environment where autistic kids are identified as such, except by their parents, after the fact.

So I’m literally treating these children as I would any other human: with cheer, and with kindness, with gentleness, silliness, understanding.

So when the adult says to me, “he never plays this way!” I worry.

Because I am not an extraordinary person. I am not doing anything special—just paying attention to the child, offering lighthearted interaction, responding to their needs and desires as best as I understand them. It’s how I approach every child I work with—hell, it’s how I try to approach every person I know.

So when I hear, “He never plays like this!”

I don’t really know what to say. But I hope with all my heart that its not because he’s never treated like this.

I don’t have source citations, but there are apparently studies they have done where, instead of trying to teach autistic kids to do better at faking being non-autistic so they can “socialize” in a way that seems “normal” to non-autistic people, they teach the non-autistic kids to be more responsive to the sensory and other needs of the autistic child.  And the result was that suddenly this autistic kid started being much more interactive.  All they needed was, not social training, but for others around them to be interactive with them first.

I wish more teachers, parents, etc. were aware of this and adapted accordingly.




Sep/1/14
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  • me: *sees dog*
  • me: *forgets what im talking about and points out dog*



Aug/31/14
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jean-luc-gohard:

The most dangerous thing society teaches boys and men, especially white boys and men, is that their emotions are objective logic and reason and that anyone who disagrees is being irrational.




Aug/31/14
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spikespiegell:

do ya ever bring your pet up to a mirror and ur like “that you”




Aug/31/14
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Richey by Mitch Ikeda




Aug/31/14
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fuckyeahmsp:

I’ve never seen this pic before!

fuckyeahmsp:

I’ve never seen this pic before!